Last Full Measure


The Wounded Knee Monument at Fort Riley, Kansas, was erected by the surviving members of the Seventh Cavalry and dedicated on July 25, 1893, to an audience of over 5,500 spectators.[1]

Many of your comrades fell in these conflicts; their names are on yonder monument; but when that has crumbled and the winds of the prairie shall have scattered the last mouldering remnant from its pedestal, the names of the men written there will still be remembered and cherished as heroes who died for their country…
–Honorable J. R. Burton, 1893, at the dedication of the Wounded Knee Monument at Fort Riley–

During the Pine Ridge Campaign of 1890-’91, forty-five soldiers, including one Indian scout, lost their lives. One of the main purposes of this blog is to document the lives of the soldiers who gave their last full measure during that winter campaign, and this page serves as a compilation of those fallen. 

Amazingly, only two of the soldiers died of disease, a fifty-four-year-old captain that suffered a heart attack and a thirty-four-old first lieutenant who died from the effects of exposure. Only three died from non-battle related injuries. One was a Nebraska National Guardsman that was accidentally shot by a comrade while on picket duty. The other two were killed in a railroad accident on the return trip to Fort Riley. Forty were killed in action or died of the effects from wounds received in battle. The ranks of the dead included two Captains, three First Lieutenants, one Sergeant Major, one First Sergeant, one Quartermaster Sergeant, five Sergeants, three Corporals, one Blacksmith, one Saddler, one Hospital Steward, and twenty-six Privates including one Buffalo Soldier and one Oglala Indian Scout. Eighteen of these soldiers were foreign-born, all from Europe, with half of those coming from the United Kingdom. There were only two soldiers among the dead that were from the South, both from South Carolina.

On New Years Eve, 1890, the troopers of the Seventh Cavalry Regiment paid their final respects to thirty of their fallen comrades in a make shift cemetery at the Pine Ridge Agency. Nebraska State Journal correspondent, William F. Kelley, recorded the funeral of the thirty in an article entitled “Remains of Fallen Soldiers Laid at Rest.”[1]

Pine Ridge Agency, S. D. (via Rushville, Neb.), Jan. 1, 1891—[Special]—A blizzard was blowing, the wind swept over the plain in fearful gusts, with all strength and violence, and snow filled the air so dense that objects fifty feet away were not visible. It is a terrible day. The long delayed storm is upon us and over the hills the army wagons wended their way, followed by the army in mournful silence. Amid this blinding roar they go to place the bodies of those who, but two days ago were their comrades, in the frozen ground, daily companions some for many a year, sharing the pleasures and hardships of many a rough march of a soldier’s life. Fifteen ambulances were there bearing the bodies of thirty men, escorted by Troops A, B, D and E and the little body that remains of K Troop of the Seventh Cavalry. These were followed by the Second Regiment of infantry. The little cemetery lies on the top of a hill, one mile to the south and hither the soldier boys slowly took their way plodding through the heavy snow. The bell upon the Episcopal chapel rang out dismally as the troops marched by. Many an eye was filled with tears, many a voice choked with a sob as the rough pine boxes were lowered into the cold ground. Trumpeter Hardy of the Seventh pealed forth a last farewell upon his cornet as he sounded the “taps call.” The old veteran bugler deeply affected all by the pathetic tones he sounded to the brave comrades who, alas, would never more answer any earthly calls.

Rev. Cook of the Episcopal chapel and his assistant conducted the services according to the ritual of that church. They were surrounded by Colonel Forsythe and all the regimental officers. The Seventh then gradually dispersed, allowing the infantry men to fulfill the last sad rites.

Gallant soldiers, you fought the foe most nobly; you wavered not in the hour of danger, when the treacherous Indian, without warning, shot you down upon Wounded Knee; you fought better than the world can ever know. Those alone who saw you know best how, like heroes, you stood and fell. Although great monuments may not be erected to your memories, although you were not entombed in banks of flowers, your deeds on that bloody day will live long in the hearts of many whom fortune destined should look on and sing of your deeds and courage.

Soldier Cemetery

“Graves of Soldiers who were killed at battle of Wounded Knee, Dec. 29th, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency, S. D., 30 in number.” by W. R. Cross, circa 1891.

U.S. Military Burial Registry for Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery, South Dakota.[3]

U.S. Military Burial Registry for Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery, South Dakota.[3]

Five more soldiers would be buried in that same cemetery over the next two weeks. Three of the soldiers were disinterred by their relatives and moved to family plots or local cemeteries in the soldiers’ home towns. In October 1906, all but one of the soldiers were exhumed with twenty-nine being re-interred at Fort Riley, Kansas, and one at Fort Robinson, and later Fort McPherson, Nebraska. The lone remaining soldier buried at the Pine Ridge Agency is the U.S. Indian Scout, High Back Bone, or Blueshield as recorded on the cemetery records. [4] Mr. W. A. Luke was employed to disinter the soldiers at Pine Ridge and prepare them for relocation to Fort Riley. He later provided detail of the conditions when disinterring the remains:

On October 1906

Reported in the Dakota County Herald, Dakota City, Nebraska, October 5, 1906.[5]

 We found the remains in very shallow graves, some in coffins inside of rough boxes, others because of the frozen condition of the body could only be placed in rough boxes. They were buried in the clothing they were wearing at the time when they fell, including uniform, gloves, overcoat, spurs, with personal effects including signet ring, watch, and other possessions such as small amounts of money.

[W]e found one grave empty; possibly relatives or friends had been there first. The 29 cases containing the remains of the 29 deceased of the Seventh Cavalry were shipped to Fort Riley, Kans., to be re-interred in the Post Cemetery, and the case containing the remains of the one member of the Ninth U.S. Cavalry (negro) were shipped to Fort Robinson, Nebr., to be re-interred in the Post Cemetery.[6]

Following is the list of all forty-five soldiers that died during the Pine Ridge Campaign November 1890 – January 1891; they are listed from youngest to oldest.

Private Harry B. Stone, B Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born November 20, 1871, Monterey, Michigan
Died January 12, 1891, Pine Ridge, South Dakota
Interred January, 1891, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

158517861_1493057321Private William F. McClintock, K Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born May, 1870, Freedom, Ohio
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred, Freedom West Cemetery, Freedom, Ohio

 ~

Private John Costello, B Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born July 27, 1869, Limerick, Ireland
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private James E. Kelly, I Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born January 7, 1868, Chicago, Illinois
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred, Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Illinois

~

Private Ralph L. Cook, B Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1867, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private Pierce Cummings, I Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1867, Waterford, Ireland
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private Bernhard Zehnder, I Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1867, Einsiedeln, Switzerland
Died December 29, 1890, Pine Ridge, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Corporal Harry R. Forrest, B Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1866, Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private Dominick Franceschetti, D Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1866, Cologna, Austria
Died December 30, 1890, White Clay, South Dakota
Interred January 7, 1891, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private William M. Adams, K Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1866, Paisley, Scotland
Died December 30, 1890, Pine Ridge, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private George L. Elliott, K Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1866, Lewiston, Maine
Died January 13, 1891, Pine Ridge, South Dakota
Interred January, 1891, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

First Sergeant Dora Sherman Coffey, B Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born July 1866, Ellettsville, Indiana
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred January 21, 1891, Methodist Cemetery, Ellettsville, Indiana

~

Private Philip Schwenkey, K Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born January 8, 1865, Orange, New Jersey
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred, February 5, 1891, Orange, New Jersey

~

Private William S. Mezo, B Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1865, Franklin County, Illinois
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Hospital Steward Oscar Pollak, 7th Cavalry

Born 1865, Pest, Hungary
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Sergeant Henry Howard, I Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1865, Chicago, Illinois
Died January 23, 1891, Fort Riley Kansas
Interred January, 1891, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private Joseph Murphy, K Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1865, Roscommon, Ireland
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~


charles-haywood-headstonePrivate Charles Haywood, D Troop, 9th Cavalry

Born 1865, Charleston, South Carolina
Died December 30, 1890, Pine Ridge, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October, 1906, Fort Niobrara Post Cemetery
Re-interred, Fort McPherson National Cemetery

~

Private George P. Johnson, A Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1864, Svanninge, Germany
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private James Logan, A Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1864, Lancaster, England
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Quartermaster Sergeant Thomas Schartel, E Battery, 1st Artillery

Born June 1864, Buffalo, New York
Died January 26, 1891, Irving, Kansas
Interred January, 1891, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Saddler Henry Frey, A Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1863, Schaffhausen, Switzerland
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private John M. McCue, K Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1863, Maple Grove, Wisconsin
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Sergeant Alvin H. Haselwood, A Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born March, 1862, Grant County, Kentucky
Died March 11, 1891, Fort Riley, Kansas
Interred March, 1891, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private Michael Regan, A Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1862, Sligo, Ireland
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private Daniel Twohig, I Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1862, Cincinnati, Ohio
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private Herman Granberg, A Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born January 18, 1861, Eskilstuna, Södermanland, Sweden
Died December 30, 1890, Pine Ridge, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private August Kellner, E Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1861, Klein Schönwalde, Stralsund, Pomerania, Prussia
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private John W. Meil, G Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1861, Cincinnati, Ohio
Died January 26, 1891, Irving, Kansas
Interred January, 1891, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Sergeant Arthur C. Dyer, A Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1860, Ottawa, Illinois
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Corporal Charles H. Newell, B Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1859, Chester County, Pennsylvania
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private Jan DeVreede, C Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1858, Antwerp, Belgium
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Corporal Albert Symes Bone, I Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1858, Basingstoke, England
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

First Lieutenant John Sanford Mason, Jr., C Company, 1st Infantry

Born April 26, 1856, Benicia, California
Died February 13, 1891, Pine Ridge Agency, South Dakota
Interred 1891, Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery

~

Private Frank T. Reinecky, D Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1860, Long Island, New York
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

First Lieutenant James DeFrees Mann, K Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born May 15., 1854, Syracuse, Indiana
Died January 15, 1891, Fort Riley, Kansas
Interred January, 1891, Fort Riley Post Cemetery
Re-interred June, 1891, Arlington National Cemetery

~

Sergeant William Thomas Hodges, K Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born June 16, 1853, Street, England
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private George Wilhower, C Company, 2nd Regiment, Nebraska National Guard

Born December 8, 1853, Virginia
Died January 12, 1891, Gordon, Nebraska
Interred January 21, 1891, Schuyler Cemetery, Colfax County, Nebraska

~

Sergeant Robert H. Nettles, E Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1852, Limerick, Ireland
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Blacksmith Gustave Korn, I Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born 1852, Sprotau, Germany
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

First Lieutenant Edward Wanton Casey, 22nd Infantry

Born December 1, 1850, Benicia, California
Died January 7, 1891, White River, South Dakota
Interred January 12, 1891, Silas Casey Lot, North Kingstown, Rhode Island

~


5816415_111827434959Captain George David Wallace, K Troop, 7th Cavalry

Born June 29, 1849, York, South Carolina
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred January, 1891, Rose Hill Cemetery, York, South Carolina

~

Sergeant Major Richard Winick Corwine, 7th Cavalry

Born July 19, 1844, Maysville, Kentucky
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery
Re-interred October 20, 1906, Fort Riley Post Cemetery

~

Private High Back Bone or Blueshield, U.S. Indian Scouts

Birth unknown,
Died December 29, 1890, Wounded Knee, South Dakota
Interred December 31, 1890, Pine Ridge Agency Cemetery

~

Captain William Mills, C Company, 2nd Infantry

Born September 19, 1836, Michigan
Died December 30, 1890, Pine Ridge, South Dakota
Interred January, 1891, Elmira, New York

 ~

Endnotes:

[1] Keith Stokes, “Visiting Fort Riley, Junction City & Manhattan, Kansas,” KansasTravel.org, http://kansastravel.org/fortriley.htm accessed 17 Aug 2013; William McHale and Robert Smith, Images of America: Fort Riley, (San Francisco: Arcadia Publishing, 2003), 21; Associated Press,”Wounded Knee Heroes,” Abilene Weekly Reflector, X (48) (1893, July 27), p. 5.
[2] William F. Kelley, ed. by Alexander Kelley and Pierre Bovis, Pine Ridge 1890:An Eye Witness Account of the Events Surrounding the Fighting at Wounded Knee, (San Francisco: P. Bovis, 1971), 205-207.
[3] Burial Registers for Military Posts, Camps, and Stations, 1768-1921, (National Archives Microfilm Publication M2014, 1 roll);
[4] James Mooney, The Ghost-Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890, (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1896), 871-872; Eli S. Ricker, Richard E. Jensen, ed., Voices of the American West, Vol. 2, The Settler and Soldier Interviews of Eli S. Ricker, 1903-1919, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2005), 55, 391-392; Associated Press, “Sleeps His Last Sleep,” Omaha Daily Bee, (Omaha, 31 December 1890), 8.
[5] Dakota County herald., October 05, 1906, Image 1, http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010270500/1906-10-05/ed-1/seq-1/ accessed 11 Dec 2013.
[6] W. A. Luke as quoted in Renee S. Flood, Lost Bird of Wounded Knee, (New York: Da Capo Press, 1998), 82.

Citation for this article: Samuel L. Russell, “Last Full Measure,” Army at Wounded Knee (Sumter, SC: Russell Martial Research, 2013-2015, http://wp.me/P3NoJy-3Q), last updated 8 Feb 2015, accessed date __________.

Advertisements

6 Responses to Last Full Measure

  1. Sam Russell says:

    In reviewing my sources, I realize that I omitted one name from the above list. Captain William Mills, C Company, 2nd Infantry Regiment died of a heart attack at Pine Ridge Agency on 30 December 1891. I will add his particulars to this post shortly.

    Like

  2. Sam Russell says:

    It appears there may have been an additional death of a military member during the campaign, making it forty-four soldiers. In digging through Newspaper articles I came across the following incident involving two Nebraska National Guardsmen recorded in The Omaha Bee:

    SHOT THROUGH THE BREAST.
    A Fatal Accident Brings Grief to the Ranks of Company K.
    GEORGE WILLHOW KILLED BY A COMRADE
    GORDON, Neb., Jan. 12.-{Special Telegram to THE BEE.}-Company K regrets an accident that caused the death of one of its members. George Willhow, while on guard duty, extended his march over the beat of Percy, on being challenged, an altercation occurred, in a pleasant way, which resulted in the death of Willhow, who was shot through the shoulder blade. The cause of Willhow’s death was purely accidental and is much regretted by the boys. Hooper is completely distracted and says he would much prefer it were he.
    He has the sympathy of the boys and it is to be hoped the consequences to him may not prove serious. Captain Degman feels very badly over the mishap and has always cautioned the boys in the manner in which they should handle their guns. It is purely a case of not knowing it was loaded, or not knowing it was cocked rather.

    The following day The Bee followed up with a different spelling of the deceased guardsman, “As I write, the remains of George Wilhouser of Company K, Second regiment, are being carried by his comrades with muffled drums to the depot, to be sent to his grief stricken mother.”

    An article in the Logansport Pharos-Tribune described the incident as more of two soldiers fooling around:

    OMAHA, Neb., Jan. 13.—Monday evening George Willhow and T. B. Hooper of Company K, Nebraska National Guards, stationed at Gordon, were playing with a rifle. The gun went off, the bullet striking Willhow in the neck, cutting the jugular. Death soon followed. Willhow was not an enlisted member, but voluntarily accompanied the company.

    Like

  3. Sam Russell says:

    In pouring over articles in the Omaha Daily Bee, I came across another casualty from the Pine Ridge Campaign: First Lieutenant John Sanford Mason, Jr., First Infantry. The article from the 18 February issue reads:

    The funeral of Lieutenant Mason, First infantry, took place at the agency Sunday afternoon. His body was escorted by a mounted company two miles out, where it was met by Henry’s battalion. The troopers formed on each side and facing round, all came to advance carbine. As the body with its escort passed between the trumpeters sounded the Dead march. Then the whole command followed till the Ninth cavalry camp was reached, when, as the body was leaving, “taps” were sounded. The ceremony was impressive and a tribute to a young soldier and the son of a soldier, who, now on the retired list, mourns his loss.

    Referring back to one of my many sources, After Wounded Knee, Correspondence of Major and Surgeon John Vance Lauderdale while Serving with the Army Occupying the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, 1890-1891, the doctor provides additional details of the death of Lieutenant Mason. Wednesday, February 11th, 1891:

    Yesterday one of the young officers who left his wife and children in California, and has been grieving to go home ever since he came, was out yesterday with his company on mounted drill, returned and had to go to bed. He had an ear ache and neuralgia last night, but today there seems to be brain trouble, and he has been somewhat delirious, although the fever keeps within bounds. It is bad enough to be sick at all while out on a winter campaign, but to have one’s mind affected is a very sad state. His mother was insane, and I fear his brain will give way entirely.” Friday, February 13th, “One of our young officers who has been under my care for a few days, developed on Tuesday night after a cold ride in the afternoon, a severe inflammation of his brain. He has been unconscious almost all the time since, and now the vital spark is fast leaving him. Lt. John M. Mason is his name. He is a son-in-law of Gen’l Ord, and will leave a wife and two children.

    In another letter later that same day Major Lauderdale writes, “The death of the officer, Lt. Mason, has cast a gloom over the Camp as he was a delicate young man and not fit for the duties of a Winter Campaign against the Indians in this inhospitable region. He never should have tried. But he did not want to shirk duty, and went beyond his strength.” The following day Dr. Lauderdale wrote, “Today an undertaker came from R[ushville] and bore away the casket containing the remains of Lt. M. Mr. Striking the Presbyterian Missionary conducted a short service at the house of the agent, which the Officers attended. There was a guard of honor, and the band also to make up the procession which accompanied the carriage just to the edge of the camp, and the undertaker took up his route the remainder of the way along.”

    Like

  4. alysonstrand says:

    Mr. Russell,
    While looking through family photos, I found a photograph of my Great Great Great Grandfather in what appears to be a uniform similar to those worn in the Battle of Wounded Knee. I was hoping I could send you the photograph via email and get your opinion on it. Please email me at alysonlstrand@gmail.com Thank you!

    Like

    • Lightninghawk says:

      You should feel ashamed of what your not-so-great grandfather did out at wounded knee, dont get the facts twisted the 7th fired upon unarmed men women and children, read the news paper article about the soldier killed by his so called comrade, they lied about what happened to him, it was all a lie, most of the soldiers where just blindly following orders like mindless puppets not heros. White people. what do you expect from white people……..lies thats what. Thanks, have nice day and go back to the country from which your ancestors came.

      Like

  5. Mr. Russell,

    I know where William F. McClintock was re-interred. My mother and I found his marker about about 42 years ago in Freedom Ohio. I always remembered it and just now googled his name, finding this website. Email me and I can provide more detail.

    Thank you.
    John S. Joeright
    Juneau Alaska

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s